Archive

Archive for the ‘Design’ Category

Public Intervention with plants: “Travelling Plants”

September 29th, 2014 5 comments

travelling_plants_banner

The previous chapter described the artwork “Season Patterns”, which captured natural environmental changes. The interactive relationship only existed between the artist and his surrounding natural environment. In contrast to that, the collaboration project “Travelling Plants” with Juliane Springsguth created a direct interactive relationship between plants and humans as well as between humans and humans.

The interaction between humans and plants intended to improve the human well-being. This improvement was applied in an urban context, where the daily life is characterized by stress and appointments [Shoemaker2002, page 140]. Public transport as a public space is a location where people have the time to rest, although the environment does not provide a relaxing friendly atmosphere. Under these circumstances, a setting with plants has the ability to transform a stressful mood to a relaxing state of mind more easily [Shoemaker2002, pp. 181]. The famous landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted assigned plants a healing power for the human mind [Flagler1994, page 232]. Read more...

Visualizing techniques with plants for Interaction Design

June 2nd, 2014 21 comments

Nowadays information becomes more pervasive and crucial in a knowledge-based society [ZhaoMoere2008]. Therefore it is important for a society to develop an easy access to communicate meaning and functionality of information [MoereOffenhuber2009]. The easiest information access exists in our natural everyday physical environment. Public screens attempt to address this task. Unfortunately, current public screens hold several disadvantages for our public environment. They need a dedicated flat surface, illuminating their surrounded environments, and address only the visual sense. Furthermore, people often associate public screens with advertisement and pay less attention to them [MoereOffenhuber2009]. Therefore, it is rational to investigate information displays beyond the traditional screen-based visualizations. Plants are one of these objects, which are omnipresent in our daily physical environment. For this reason, data sculptures with plants might be an alternative approach to solve the problems of public screens and reach wide audiences. The following artworks are interpreted as the next development steps of the contemporary plant-based artworks from chapter 2.3 “Ethnobotany”. In this stage electronic and digital technology is applied to plants.

Within the scope of my research I will present a qualitative evaluation of visualizing techniques with plants. The evaluation model is based on the comparison methods developed by Andrew Vande Moere, Dietmar Offenhuber [MoereOffenhuber2009], and as well as Matthew Brehmer, and Tamara Munzner (2013) [BrehmerMunzer]. The evaluation result reveals their visual encoding techniques, and which characteristic of data they visualize. Furthermore, the outcome assigns approaches of creating more intriguing, and easy memorable visualizations. Read more...

Horticulture

May 31st, 2014 5 comments

horticulture

Humans use their knowledge about plants and their ecology for enhancing their life quality. Their accomplishments related to plant cultivation is associated to the botany discipline horticulture. That includes activities from the fields of science, technology, and business. Horticulture incorporates the tasks and services of food production, plant conservation, horticulture therapy, landscape restoration, landscape and garden design. All the human endeavours towards horticulture serve the goal of developing and maintaining human health and well-being.

Horticulture is strongly connected with gardening and should not be distinguished with agriculture. Agriculture is usually organized in large fields that grow only one plant species (mono culture). Furthermore, gardens are in most cases isolated from its environment. A common field is not protected by a fence or other construction. Moreover, agriculture makes heavy use of big machines for cultivating their plant growth and food production. The last and another important difference between horticulture and agriculture is the lack of an appealing design practice in agriculture [Nemitz2000, page 173]. Read more...

Books about Plants, Art and Environments

January 25th, 2014 3 comments

Plant Colour Patterns

During my research for my master thesis, I got some nice book recommendations about plants, nature, art and environment.

Natural artworks

These books provide a good overview how plants are used in Fine Arts over the last 100 years. Furthermore, it addresses and describes the environmental impacts of these design and art approaches. Pretty useful for an art history overview.

Read more...

Visualize data and stories with plants

November 21st, 2013 No comments

Plant Colour Patterns

On my last blog post "Can plants be a music interface" I explored plants as a possible input channel for musical devices. This time, I want to explore plants as a kind of display. Especially, how artists, designers, and engineers can communicate their data and stories through plants. More than a few plant based narrative approaches exist in our culture. They are mostly connected with old traditions and rituals. For instance, the Christmas tree or the Harvest festival (picture) are very common rituals for us. In this article I strongly focus on (Fine) Arts and Design approaches than on ritual driven expressions. The first part is more Fine Art and analog (without technology) oriented and the second part focuses on Design approaches with the support of Technology.

**** UPDATE NEW VERSION HERE ****

Read more...

Making of wasfuttern.de: Produktion und der Launch

July 26th, 2013 1 comment

wasfuttern - making of - Part 3

Im letzten Blogartikel berichtete ich über die Ergebnisse unserer Feldstudie. Nun stand fest, was wie genau umgesetzt werden mußte. In diesem Blogartikel berichte ich euch über unsere Hürden bei der Produktion und wie wir bei unserem Launch vorgegangen sind.

5. Produktion

Die Feldstudie gab uns einen genauen Aufschluß was wir wollten. Nun ging es darum sich die Hände mit der Programmierung schmutzig zu machen. Kleine, mittlere und zum Teil ziemlich große Usability Anpassungen mussten umgesetzt werden. Read more...

Categories: Design Tags: , , , , ,

Making of wasfuttern.de: Vom visuellen Gesicht zur Feldstudie

July 22nd, 2013 No comments

wasfuttern - making of - Part 2

Im ersten Teil der Making-Of Serie habe ich die Randbedingungen des Projektes vorgestellt und unser Verfahren mit Hilfe von MockUps die Struktur und den Inhalt unserer App zu definieren. In diesem Beitrag geht es um die visuelle Gestaltung, sprich das Grafik Design unserer Ap. Ein weiteres Thema sind die Ergebnisse unserer kleinen Feldstudie mit Freunden.

3. Eine Art Mischung von Corporate Design und Screen Design

Die Erstellung eines visuellen Gesicht war weniger ein technisches und gestalterisches Problem, es war eher ein Budgetproblem. An dieser Stelle mußten wir einen großen Spagat zwischen unseren Ansprüchen und den stark begrenzten Mitteln machen. Read more...

Making of wasfuttern.de: Vom Mock-Up zum interaktiven Prototypen

July 14th, 2013 No comments

wasfuttern - making of - Part1

Seit Mitte/Ende Februar hat das Projekt wasfuttern.de das Licht der Welt erblickt. Mein frühiger Schulkollege Rusbeh kam vor ca. 1 Jahr auf mich zu mit seiner Antwort auf die alltägliche Frage "Was soll ich heute wo essen?". Jeder kennt sicherlich diese immer wieder auftretende Frage in der Mittagspause. In diesem Blogartikel gebe ich einen Einblick in unseren User-Centered Design Entstehungsprozess von wasfuttern.de.

Read more...

My most important Twitter Messages #16

July 1st, 2013 No comments

Twitter von der hess

A small summary of my Twitter messages from February 2013- June 2013:

Read more...

Book review: The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces

March 29th, 2013 2 comments

.

In relation of my masterthesis and my interests in location-based mobile apps I read the book "The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces" by William H. Whyte. The book is quite old and the first edition was published around 1980. My research focus was in particular in exploring how people behave in urban environments WITHOUT mobile communication technology. I am digital native, so I have no real idea how the world was before mobiles, walkmans and Game Boys. The book delivers a really good insight how people meet and behave in small urban places (plazas and small parks). Furthermore, it describes the vital elements of these plazas. How they correlate to each other  and how to design them. The target groups of this book are more or less architects, city planners and landscape architects. But even for urban activists and street artists the book has some value. The elements of small urban spaces haven't changed much since 1980. Almost each element has his own chapter:
Read more...